ANDREA'S ANGLE

This December, we partnered with a range of prominent female artists as we celebrated the opening of our Flagship in Miami’s Design District during Art Basel. Learn more about these inspiring women, their innovative processes and why we’re proud to consider them part of our tribe.

“I'm constantly inspired by the process of creative exploration and am honored to be partnering with each of these female artists who offer their own unique perspective.”
— Andrea Lieberman

LANA GOMEZ 

Hello! Can you tell us about yourself, where are you from and how that has influenced the woman you are today?

I am originally from Memphis Tennessee. I grew up in a family where creativity was the glue. We had a basement turned into a craft room where I spent many years of my life. I studied painting at the University of Tennessee, I am thankful that my mom and stepdad encouraged me to follow my passion and a path that made me happy. I believe the role that my mom played, the endless hours she devoted to creativity, are the roots that helped me grow into the woman I am today. 

Where do you go for inspiration when starting a new project?

Truly the hardest part is beginning- I always think of color combinations or techniques I am interested in exploring based on a plethora of visual stimulation that I am naturally drawn to and am constantly absorbing. When my mind relaxes, I make sense of the world through abstract patterns. I find inspiration from so many places; fashion, interior design, ceramicists, oil spills, dilapidating materials, candy, you name it. I find anything can be an inspiration when my mind is open! 

What does confidence mean to you?

The ability to quiet exterior noise and trust in myself. Knowing that when I listen to my heart and follow my soul great things happen. The feeling of knowing I’m working hard without telling everyone, putting in my all while knowing I can’t do it all, always being humble and striving to be the best person I can be gives me confidence because I know I am doing my personal best.

"The feeling of knowing I’m working hard without telling everyone, putting in my all while knowing I can’t do it all, always being humble and striving to be the best person I can be gives me confidence because I know I am doing my personal best."

Are there any themes that you address in your art, or what stories do your paintings tell?

I name each piece after a memory or moment in life that may be fleeting or forgotten. From “Don’t Bullshit a bullshitter” which was told to me by my grandfather in high school when he broke up a party I was having when my parents were out of town, to “It’s a Wild World” the song all of the parents sung to my friends and I at our graduation party. Each piece serves as a bookmark for these times that may have been pivotal or trivial but they each tell a story for me and a viewer may see something completely different which is what makes each piece so interesting. It’s like life, each of us has our own unique experiences which is fascinating to me. 

If you could give your younger self any advice based on everything you know now, what would it be?

Do what you love, find a way to make it work, embrace your own unique characteristics, and don’t worry about what others think. Make your unique mark on the world and don’t try to recreate the wheel. Life can fly by in an instant so make each day count! 

What has been one of the most memorable pieces you’ve worked on as an Artist?

The piece “I Can Show You the World” which is to date one of my favorites. It took weeks to dry, it had to bake it in the sun, I used a hairdryer, I had to squeeze paint out of pockets that were holding moisture, it was a real labor of love. You can feel the work that I had to put into it when you look at it which is what makes it so dynamic. Each piece is like a baby of mine, I love them all for many different reasons. I will never ever stop tweaking a piece until I feel proud of it.

DANIÉ GÓMEZ-ORTIGOZA 

Hello! Can you tell us about yourself, where you are from and how that has influenced the woman you are today?

I was born in Mexico City, and have lived in Madrid, New York, Toronto, Stockholm, Miami and recently Dallas. For the last 5 years I’ve been known as Journey of a Braid. For me, braiding is a visual manifesto that calls for the power of the collective as a joined force of individuals. I chose art as a medium to express what I could see, which is that an invisible thread braids all narratives together, including our ancestry and our future selves. This practice evolved into performance art, through braiding circles where I braid men and women together as an act of collective healing. 

What empowers you to create?

Humanity; I see the big imbalances happening around the world which are the results of ancestral trauma and feelings of not belonging to something greater. I see the thread that can reconnect us, and I spend my days making it visible. 

What does confidence mean to you?

Confidence is not being shaken by ego or ambition, just following the light of purpose. Confidence is not allowing your success or frustration to imbalance you because you know they are both the same.

"I see the big imbalances happening around the world which are the results of ancestral trauma and feelings of not belonging to something greater. I see the thread that can reconnect us, and I spend my days making it visible."

What or who has been your most significant influence and how has that shaped your style sensibility?

My own pain has been a great influence. Way too many members of my family have committed suicide or have had a life shaped by depression. I have to clear that energy from the past for my childrens’ future not to be molded by it. We are all a continuation of narratives from our past. The energy of inspiring people has also been integral; my husband, who is my rock and keeps me balanced, John DeMartini who is an incredible human behaviour specialist and a very close friend, Martha Gareff and her vision and love for life, my mother’s journey, Nina Surel, Kathryn Mikesell and Aurora Molina who are three artists that have pulled me into this path of self-discovery through creating. 

What has been one of the most memorable pieces you’ve worked on as an artist?

A collective installation I created at the Mexican Consulate. It consisted of lines of threads all connected, and was activated through a performance piece I wrote on the women that have shaped Mexican history and the stories we carry from them and our cultural baggage, and how to overcome them by reframing the narrative.

MARTINA KENNAN 

Hello! Can you tell us about yourself, where you are from and how that has influenced the woman you are today?

I was born in a beautiful place called Cordoba, in Argentina. Although I don't live there anymore, I have a great connection with the nature and the simplicity of this place. My grandmother Ana taught me such strong and honest values that to this day I think about all her lessons when they ask me what kind of person I consider myself. especially to be humble and grateful about all we have. 

Your photography is stunning. Can you share how you started on this path and did you pursue this form of art intuitively?

My first connection to photography was actually super spontaneous. My boyfriend at the time was a photographer so I decided to give him a film camera as a birthday gift. Once I was in the store I decided to buy one for myself. Since I was going to travel to study social communication in Milan I thought it would be nice to have one for me to document my experiences there. It was love at first sight. Since then I have never stopped taking pictures and expressing myself through images. I always like to joke that photography has been like my therapist. 

What does being a woman mean to you?

Being a woman for me is a constant mix of emotions, a fascinating dualism between what we think we should be and what we really are. I like to constantly trigger my conception of femininity and explore different ways of empowering myself as a woman.

What does your creative process look like?

My creative process does not have a stable structure. Each project is shaped differently, it depends on my state of mind and more than anything on my intuition. A witch once told me that I always had to trust my third eye, that it would be the key to my profession. Once I get an idea, a feeling or a hunch I go for it and that's where the rest comes from. 

How would you describe the mood of your work? 

My mood is full of dualities—I think about the dark full of light, what seduces because it does not seduce, the subtle but provocative, the instantaneous, spontaneous, improvised but with a lot of thought behind it. Opposites of the natural and fluid but exact and premeditated at the same time It's all at the same time. It's no big deal. There is a special energy that transmits something unique and unusual, special. We feel identified with all that, we are all that. 

"My mood is full of dualities—I think about the dark full of light, what seduces because it does not seduce, the subtle but provocative, the instantaneous, spontaneous… improvised but with a lot of thought behind it."

If you could give your younger self one piece of advice, what would it be? 

Don't tattoo your back!! It's kind of a cliche, and I hate cliches, but I will say " follow your intuition, always, even if it looks impossible”. But be careful, don't confuse intuition with impulsivity. Honest advice from an Aries! 

Are there any upcoming personal or work projects you are working on and excited to share?

Going back to Argentina in a couple of weeks. I'm organizing a beautiful photo project to showcase all local designers, models and creatives. And our beautiful city, Buenos Aires. Stay tuned!

JESSAMYN GO

Hello! Can you tell us about yourself, where you are from and how that has influenced the woman you are today?

I was born in NYC, raised in the suburbs of Long Island and cultured in the city. I am a 1st generation American born of Chinese and Filipino immigrants who came to NY in the 70’s. As a kid I was quite confused about my cultural identity—I didn’t speak my heritage languages and I found myself constantly trying to assimilate to the cultures that surrounded me. Through my adult years I found myself grappling with similar insecurities, but have thankfully worked through it. I strive to be a woman cultured of independent thought, wanting to connect deeper with my most genuine soulful self, and building a community of open minds that inspires me. 

We admire the meditative meaning behind your artwork. Can you tell us more about the vision behind Femme Sole and how you got started?

Working with ceramics is a very sensual practice. It is visual, tactile, and auditory. I mostly create on a pottery wheel, a machine that hums, vibrates, and thumps. The sound is meditative, the frequency of the hum, the vibrations under my fingertips, and the percussive thumping like a heartbeat. It calms me, and soothes me. I believe this is reflective in the shapes of the vessels I create and it is my intention to share that energy through Femme Sole pieces. 

Our brand is focused on promoting a more conscious approach to our design practices and lifestyle. What inspired Femme Sole and how is it socially conscious?

Femme Sole is my company, named to honor the spirit and independence of female-owned businesses. I started working with clay in 2018 and rapidly became addicted. I honed my technique, starting to teach a beginners class at a studio a year later. Once the pandemic hit in 2020 my partner and I relocated from Brooklyn to Long Island where I slowly assembled a home studio, one piece of equipment at a time, and sold my pieces on social media to raise funds for the Black Lives Matter movement. The pieces sold quickly and it encouraged me to create more, starting with functional pieces for the home that I sold at farmer’s markets, craft fairs and local boutiques, generating income to fund the purchases of the necessary equipment for my studio. This is how it all began.

Where do you go for inspiration when starting a new project?

I find my inspiration from the environment that surrounds me. My most recent fine art work is inspired by the current events surrounding social issues for women’s rights, specifically our rights of choice for abortion and the fight against the oppression and violence towards the women of Iran. 

What does confidence mean to you?

Confidence is celebrating the difference of oneself and style while still being able to appreciate and admire those of others without having to replicate. Confidence is trust, honesty and transparency. I find confidence knowing I am blessed with a creative imagination, and have unlocked something deep inside of me that I believe I need to share with the world. 

What or who has been your most significant influence and how has that shaped your style sensibility?

I worked in women’s luxury fashion for over 20 years before I pivoted into this world of ceramic arts. I had the amazing experience of working for Alberta Ferretti, many of her pieces are finished with a detail that some may find as imperfect, like a raw hemline. I thought it was so bold and confident. I find this has indirectly inspired my approach to my signature collection. My personal style of dress is a comfortable mix of masculine and feminine pieces. A.L.C. designs and styling approach appeals to me because it is so effortless. Andrea’s interpretation of modern chic, ensuring each single garment is easily transformative from one day to the next depending on your mood. 

What has been one of the most memorable pieces you’ve worked on as an artist?

My most memorable series is Women. Life. Freedom. A body of work that highlights my stance in solidarity with the people and women of Iran fighting against the oppression and violence towards women. I performed an act of cutting my hair that would be burned on the surface of the vessel, most typically called Horse Hair Pottery or Horse Hair Raku, and shared a video of it on social media, receiving hundreds of messages from all over the globe. In a world of global unrest we are all experiencing our own fights for rights of choice. I was able to share that and build a community of shared sentiment that just proves there is hope and humanity in the world.

"My most recent fine art work is inspired by the current events surrounding social issues for women’s rights, specifically our rights of choice for abortion and the fight against the oppression and violence towards the women of Iran."

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